ArchAtlas Journal - Tepe Bormi Archaeological Atlas Project: all essays referring to Tepe Bormi 2017-12-15T19:35:09+00:00 ArchAtlas archatlas@sheffield.ac.uk http://www.archatlas.org/favicon.png http://www.archatlas.org/logo.jpg tag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/feeds/journal-bysite-atom.php?s=149 Portagestag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/Portages/Portages.php2004-11-30T00:00:00+00:00Andrew Sherratt
Early trading networks carried relatively small quantities of valuable goods, often over considerable distances, both by land and water. The relationship between overland transport and carriage by river or sea helps to explain why trading centres rose to prominence at certain key positions on these routes. With very small quantities of goods, light vessels might be carried over short distances between rivers; and even when the bulk of traded goods increased, it might still be advantageous to carry the goods for short distances overland from one port to another. Sites at such break-of-bulk points became major nodes in the transport network. This presentation explores the changing geometry of early trade-routes, and especially the interface between land and sea.

Exploring Routes and Plains in Southwest Irantag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/Petrie/RoutesandPlains.php2004-11-30T00:00:00+00:00Cameron Petrie
Satellite imaging has given a new dimension to fieldwork in the varied terrain of Southwestern Iran, where the Zagros mountains separate the Mesopotamian lowlands from highland Iran, and whose successive ridges enclose fertile intermontane valleys. These fertile enclaves were often settled as early as the Neolithic, and have a continuous history of occupation down to the present day. They gained a historical importance as stepping stones on routes through the mountains (both for transhumance and trade), and as nodal points in the formation of political units.