ArchAtlas Journal - Mycenae Archaeological Atlas Project: all essays referring to Mycenae 2018-06-19T00:18:18+01:00 ArchAtlas archatlas@sheffield.ac.uk http://www.archatlas.org/favicon.png http://www.archatlas.org/logo.jpg tag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/feeds/journal-bysite-atom.php?s=67 Sites and Landscapes in 3D: Mycenaetag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/VRMLs/vrml_atlas.php?name=mycenae2005-11-30T00:00:00+00:00Andrew Sherratt and Francesco Menotti
Three-dimensional VRML geographical map of the Greek site of Mycenae, the Bronze Age site located on the trans-isthmian route between the Aegean and Italy, via the Gulf of Corinth.

Portagestag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/Portages/Portages.php2004-11-30T00:00:00+00:00Andrew Sherratt
Early trading networks carried relatively small quantities of valuable goods, often over considerable distances, both by land and water. The relationship between overland transport and carriage by river or sea helps to explain why trading centres rose to prominence at certain key positions on these routes. With very small quantities of goods, light vessels might be carried over short distances between rivers; and even when the bulk of traded goods increased, it might still be advantageous to carry the goods for short distances overland from one port to another. Sites at such break-of-bulk points became major nodes in the transport network. This presentation explores the changing geometry of early trade-routes, and especially the interface between land and sea.

Sites from Satellites: Mycenae, Greecetag:archatlas.org,2010:http://www.archatlas.org/SitesFromSatellites/sites.php?name=mycenae2003-11-30T00:00:00+00:00Andrew Sherratt
Viewed from space, the Greek Bronze Age site of Mycenae is located on the trans-isthmian route between the Aegean and Italy, via the Gulf of Corinth.