Xi'an / Chang'an

Decimal degrees: 34.26125N, 108.94215 E; WGS84.
UTM: 49S, 310530(e), 3793039(n); WGS84.
Modern Name: Xi'an
Alternate Name(s) and Spellings: Sian / Xian / Changan
Ancient Name: Chang'an
Confidence: 8 = Very Good, co-ordinate very likely to be correct.

 

  ArchAtlas Journal: visual essay and site visualisation links ArchAtlas Journal essays by site (Atom)  
Mapping the Silk Road Susan Whitfield, Victoria Swift, Alastair Morrison & Sam Vanschaik, British Library (IDP)
IDP: Mapping of archaeological sites uncovered in the early twentieth century along the Silk Road (Nov. 2010)
Little was known of the remarkable heritage of the Silk Road until explorers and archaeologists of the early twentieth century uncovered the ruins of ancient cities in the desert sands, revealing astonishing sculptures, murals and manuscripts. One of the most notable discoveries was the Buddhist cave library near the oasis town of Dunhuang on the edge of the Gobi desert in western China. The cave had been sealed and hidden at the end of the first millennium AD and only re-discovered in 1900. Forty thousand manuscripts, paintings and printed documents on paper and silk were found in the cave itself. Tens of thousands more items were excavated from other Silk Road archaeological sites. These unique items have fascinating stories to tell of life on this great trade route from 100 BC to AD 1400. Yet most were dispersed to institutions worldwide in the early 1900s, making access difficult. The size and scope of the collections, as well as their fragility and limited access, has meant that, while they constitute a primary research resource for the history and literature of the region, many of the manuscripts in particular have yet to be studied in detail. The International Dunhuang Project aims to reunite this material by making it freely available online. One part of this project includes the mapping of archaeological sites, and the digitisation of data from archaeological data collected by Aurel Stein and other researchers, using tools such as Google Earth to help users to better understand the history of the Tarim Basin and its cultures.
East-West Contacts in Eurasia Andrew Sherratt
East-West Contacts in Eurasia (2005)
Connections between the eastern and western ends of Eurasia began in the Bronze Age: China and the West co-evolved. A global viewpoint shows how this happened, first across the forests of Siberia, then by the steppes and oases of the Silk Road, then increasingly by sea, via the Indian Ocean. This is a human story of cultural encounter, exchange and creativity – and, ultimately, geo-economics.

 

  Site Condition, Preservation and Accessibility
Current or recorded site condition:
Not assessed
No relevant data on site condition in database
 
Site accessibility to general public:
Unknown
Map showing historical imagery where available

 



How to cite this page: 'OpenAtlas Site Information: Xi'an / Chang'an', ArchAtlas, Version 4.1, http://www.archatlas.org/openatlas/oashow.php?s=142, Accessed: 14 December 2017